Tag: Charlie Brown

Scotland Bound, Charlie Brown

Scotland Bound, Charlie Brown by Jason Cooper; art by Robert Pope; colours by Hannah White (KaBOOM! 2021) A pleasant graphic novel that channels the spirit of the Charlie Brown television specials rather than the Peanuts comic strip. There are some nice character moments and shout-outs, and a few laughs. The gang’s new Scottish friend Nell proves a welcome addition.

Snoopy Treasury

Snoopy Treasury by Charles M. Schulz (Book Club Associates, 1981) A large-format book combining much of “Peanuts Treasury” (1960s dailies and Sundays, black and white) with the colour Sundays from “Sandlot Peanuts” (1960s-1970s baseball themed). The result is nearly 200 pages of wit and wisdom, somewhat lopsided in favour of Charlie Brown.    

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me by Charles M. Schulz (W.H. Allen 1981) A short, simply written autobiography that extends to Schulz’s inspirations, working process and general thoughts on cartooning, illustrated piecemeal (in black-and-white) with Peanuts strips and unremarkable family photographs. Schulz is justifiably proud of his achievements but comes across rather blandly alongside them.    

The Complete Peanuts: 1993 to 1994

The Complete Peanuts: 1993 to 1994 by Charles M. Schulz (Fantagraphics Books, 2014) Spurred perhaps by Rerun’s belated coming of age, Schulz bestows upon the Peanuts gang some nice little touches of character growth (Charlie Brown’s more active pursuit of the Little Red-Haired Girl, for instance). Unfortunately, his once-consummate penmanship is starting to look shaky.    

The Complete Peanuts: 1971 to 1972

The Complete Peanuts: 1971 to 1972 by Charles M. Schulz (Fantagraphics Books, 2009) An evocatively drawn mix of wit, whimsy and preternatural wisdom. Poor old wishy-washy Charlie Brown remains the unifying figure but there are a good number of delightfully droll (and character-defining) strips involving Peppermint Patty, Sally Brown, and in particular Lucy van Pelt.