Tag: Herge

The Comics of Hergé

The Comics of Hergé: When the Lines Are Not So Clear ed. Joe Sutliff Sanders (University Press of Mississippi, 2016) This collection of determinedly academic articles will be heavy-going even for scholars and Hergé fanatics, let alone the casual Tintin fan. Although some (obscurely) interesting points are raised, the book is severely diminished—as Sanders acknowledges—by a lack of supporting artwork.…

The Sarcophagi of the Sixth Continent, Part 1

The Sarcophagi of the Sixth Continent, Part 1 by Yves Sente; ill. André Juillard; trans. Jerome Saincantin (Cinebook, 2010) An adventure of Blake & Mortimer, characters created by the late Edgar P. Jacobs (a collaborator of Hergé’s). Stylistically this is reminiscent of a Tintin story. The action, however, is unsoftened by humour and the dialogue comes unrefined from the information…

Tintin and Alph-Art

Tintin and Alph-Art by Hergé; trans. Leslie Lonsdale-Cooper & Michael Turner (Egmont, 1990) [original published by Casterman, 1986] Hergé’s final Tintin adventure exists only as a collection of unfinished black-and-white sketches. Published alongside transcripts of the text (in progress), Alph-Art serves as much to sadden as to tantalise. Energetic; nostalgic (nay, playfully self-referential): there could have been one last hurrah!…

Tintin: Flight 714

Tintin: Flight 714 by Hergé (Methuen, 1968) [first published in Tintin Magazine, 1966-1967] More so than any of the twenty-one Tintin stories that preceded it, Flight 714 is divorced from a contemporary historical setting. Though seeking (supernatural) isolation, it retains Hergé’s boundless sense of adventure, his exquisite characterisation and his incomparable, most vividly depicted humour.