Tag: Doug Naylor

Red Dwarf: The Promised Land

Red Dwarf: The Promised Land

dir. Doug Naylor (Dave, 2020)

Red Dwarf: the Promised Land (poster)

Nostalgic and fun, packed with gags both familiar and unpredictable. Production values are surprisingly high and the feature-length format allows for a better story than those of recent series. Ray Fearon plays a first-rate villain. A fitting endpoint (maybe?) for the franchise.

Red Dwarf, Series XI

Red Dwarf, Series XI

by Doug Naylor (Dave, 2016)

Red Dwarf XI

Even though it’s comprised now solely of what in earlier series was incidental humour, and careful plotting has been replaced by a laissez-faire ‘Let’s see where we are when we run out of time’ approach, it’s hard not to love Red Dwarf.

 

 

Red Dwarf IX: Back to Earth

Red Dwarf IX: Back to Earth

by Doug Naylor (2009)

Naylor_Red Dwarf IX

Though much welcome after the decade of Dwarflessness following Series VIII, this three-part 21st anniversary special exhibits a slow-moving stiltedness that belies its imaginative premise. Fans are encouraged to create their own director’s cut: a ruthless edit down to one regular-length episode.

 

Red Dwarf X

Red Dwarf X

by Doug Naylor (Dave, 2012)

Naylor_Red Dwarf X

Although still somewhat an aging caricature of its earlier series, Red Dwarf X brings back the laughs through six cleverly constructed (if frivolous) episodes. ‘Lemons’, in which the Dwarfers misassemble a flat-pack anti-aging machine, consequently time-travelling and meeting Jesus, is a highlight.

 

Red Dwarf VIII

Red Dwarf VIII

by Doug Naylor (BBC, 1999)

Naylor_Red Dwarf VIII

Returning to the eponymous mining ship, Red Dwarf became unabashedly silly and yet managed also to transmogrify into a creature of ephemeral comedic brilliance. ‘Cassandra’ is a classic episode, while elsewhere, amidst the rampant caricaturing, a long-suffering Captain Hollister steals the show.

Red Dwarf VI

Red Dwarf VI

by Rob Grant and Doug Naylor (BBC, 1993)

Grant_Naylor_Red Dwarf VI

After a stellar run from 1988-1992, Red Dwarf returned in 1993 as a caricatured shadow (almost a parody) of its first five seasons, stripping the crew of all seriousness and sacrificing thematically self-contained episodes for cheap laughs and a token story arc.